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Mangifera indica | Mango


Mangifera indica | Mango

Mango is one of the largest fruit-trees in the world. This deep-rooted, tropical tree flowers in March and early April and produces fruit during the summer months. The edible fruit is sweet but contains Urushiol – a naturally occurring chemical that can trigger an allergic reaction (also found in cashews and poison ivy). Mango trees do not tolerate freezing temperatures and make their home in warm tropical to subtropical climates.

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Bauhinia acuminata | White Orchid Tree


Bauhinia acuminata | White Orchid Tree

Bauhinia acuminata is a small, ornamental tree native to Asia and found in warm climates around the world. The multi-branch tree produces fragrant, white orchid-like flowers that bloom from spring through summer. In India, the leaves, roots, and bark are used as medicine for stomach aliments and common colds.

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Jacaranda mimosifolia | Jacaranda

The Jacaranda mimosifolia is a medium-sized tree commonly used as a flowering street or garden tree. The Jacaranda blooms late spring through early summer and flowers eye-catching lavender colored panicles.

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Ceiba speciosa | Silk Floss


 

Ceiba speciosa | Silk Floss

The Silk Floss tree stands out for its beautiful pink flowers and unique, conical prickled studded trunk which help store water for dry times. In younger trees, the trunk has stripy green hues due to its high chlorophyl content which makes it capable of performing photosynthesis when leaves are absent. The trunk turns gray with age. The Silk Floss tree is found in subtropical areas around the world.

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Plumeria rubra | Frangipani


 

Plumeria rubra | Frangipani

Plumeria rubra is the most common variant in south Florida and thrives in subtropical and tropical climates. The bright, pink spiral-shaped blooms have a strong fragrant smell and grow at the tips of the forked branches. You’ll find this small, decorative tree blooming from spring to mid-summer.

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Callistemon viminalis | Bottlebrush


Callistemon viminalis | Bottlebrush

Native to Australia, the Bottlebrush does well as an exotic in South Florida’s warm and humid climate. The smaller tree makes up for its size with a wide crown of arched branches that give the tree a cascading effect. The ‘bottlebrush’ shaped flower spikes form in spring and summer and are made up many individual flowers. The pollen at the end of the filament attract butterflies, hummingbirds, and honeybees.

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Cassia fistula | Golden Shower Tree


Cassia fistula | Golden Shower Tree

This yellow flowering beauty is a Cassia Fistula, a medium sized tree from southeast Asia and found in tropical climates. The cascading flowers are of ritual importance in the Vishu festival of Kerala and is the national tree and flower of Thailand.

 

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Washingtonia robusta | Washingtonia Palm


 

 Washingtonia robusta | Washingtonia Palm

Naturalized throughout South Florida, Washingtonia robusta or Washingtonia Palms are one of the most common palms in the world. The reason for their popularity is they adapt well to most climates and have an extremely rapid growth rate; averaging 80 feet tall at full growth. The lower leaves preserve on the tree after they die, forming a dense shaggy cover under the living fronds if not pruned. In early summer, clusters of small whitish flowers form and produce black berries that are edible and easy to germinate. The Washingtonia does well in commercial projects for its need for low water use.

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Delonix regia | Royal Poinciana


 

Delonix regia | Royal Poinciana

Delonix regia, or commonly referred to as Royal Poinciana is a very fast growing tree of about 5ft per year with full growth of 30-40ft. For several weeks in Spring and Summer, the Royal Poinciana’s wide-spreading, Fern-like canopy becomes the perfect backdrop for its flame-red flowers – a colorful sight that can be seen in tropical climates including South Florida.

 

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Kigelia africana | Sausage Tree 

Tree Named after its sausage-like fruit, the Kigalia Africana, commonly known as a Sausage Tree is native to South Africa. The gray-brown fruit hangs from long, flexible stalks with the mature fruit weighing 20 pounds and up to 30 inches in length. The seeded fruit pod attracts large wildlife but are poisonous to humans if not dried, roasted or fermented.

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Bismarckia nobilis | Bismarck Palm

Massive in size, the Bismarck Palm can reach heights of 50 ft and can grow 15 ft in the first 5 years. The light blue gray fronds have a wide spread at an early age and sharp teeth on the leaf stems. These unique palms can be found in residential and commercial landscapes and throughout South Florida.

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Beaucarnea recurvata | Ponytail Palm


Beaucarnea recurvata | Ponytail Palm

Native to Mexico, the Ponytail Palm is not actually a palm but a member of the Lilaceae family. Slow growing, it does best in warm weathered climates and does not begin to produce bloom till year 10. Drought tolerant, its expanded caudex store water for up to one year.

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Madras thorn | Pithecellobium dulce


Madras Thorn | Pithecellobium dulce

Madras Thorn is a medium-sized evergreen tree naturalized throughout the tropics. The spiny trunk of the Madras Thorn has been known to be used by the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica for medical use such as gum ailments and toothaches and the extract of the leaves for use for gall ailments and to prevent miscarriage. The tree produces coiled fruit pods that develop a hint of rose-red and split open to expose the edible sweet white pulp and black seeds. This Madras Thorn is found in our neighborhood of Flagler Village.

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Pinus elliottii | Slash Pine


Pinus elliottii | Slash Pine

This beauty found Flagler Village Farm is a Pinus elliottii, commonly known as the slash pine – a fast-growing pine native to the Southeast United States. This medium to large tree produces glossy brown-red cones and has distinctive evergreen needle leaves.

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Swietenia mahagoni | Mahogany tree


 

Swietenia mahagoni | Mahogany tree

The Mahogany tree, Swietenia Mahagoni, is a medium to large shade tree native to South Florida. It’s fruit is a wood-like capsule that splits into 5 parts releasing the seeds. The Mahogany tree is listed as endangered on the Preservation of Native Flora of Florida Act as the valuable timber has been over harvested.

 

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Bucida buceras | Black Olive



Bucida buceras | Black Olive

Bucida buceras | Black Olive The Black Olive is a widely used street tree throughout South Florida. Forming into an oval canopy when matured, the Black Olive provides nice shade that is attractive to birds for nesting and covering.

 

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Terminalia catappa | Tropical Almond


Terminalia catappa | Tropical Almond

Tropical Almond, Terminalia catappa, is a popular ornamental and shade tree that has a broad canopy with strong leaves that change to bright red/orange before it’s annual defoliation. Naturalized in South Florida, it can withstand high coastal winds and does well with sandy soils.

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Ficus benghalensis | Banyan Tree

The beginning stages of a Banyan tree’s life start as an epiphyte where the seeds germinate in crevices of a host tree. Known for its wide stance and large canopy, the roots of the Banyan tree grow downwards as aerial roots and form into thick trucks once established. This banyan is decorated for the holidays and located at the courtyard of Chima Fort Lauderdale.

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Roystonea regia | Royal Palm

The Royal Palm is the national tree of Cuba and an iconic palm of South Florida and subtropical climates. The majestic size of a mature palm hits heights of 50-100ft and a canopy of 25ft. The fronds are used at the religious observance, Palm Sunday, when able to be grown in the area’s climate.

 

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Eucalyptus deglupta | Rainbow Eucalyptus


 Eucalyptus deglupta | Rainbow Eucalyptus

The showy Rainbow Eucalyptus earns its colors with age. As patches of bark shed, the vibrant green underneath is shown. This changes to a spectrum of color as it matures creating the pastel streaks.

 

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Taxodium mucronatum | Montezuma Bald Cypress


Taxodium mucronatum, Montezuma Bald Cypress

Taxodium mucronatum, Montezuma Bald Cypress is a fast-growing tree that averages 70 feet tall with a thick trunk. Most of the cypress pre-historic forests are now extinct, despite the fact that it was once distributed across North America. There are only three forms of the cypress genus, Taxodium, that remain: Baldcypress, Pondcypress and Montezuma cypress. You can spy this cypress at First Fort Lauderdale Church on Broward Blvd.

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Dracaena cinnabari | Dragon Blood tree


Dracaena cinnabari | Dragon Blood Tree

Dracaena cinnabari or Dragon Blood tree receives its name from the red sap the tree produces. The red resin was coveted in the ancient world and is still used today for dye and medicine. The tightly packed and unusual dome of the tree top helps provide shade which reduces evaporation, making the Dragon Blood Tree drought tolerant. The Dragon Blood Tree is one of our favorites in Flagler Village!

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Quercus virginiana | Live Oak


Quercus virginiana | Live Oak

The tree receives its name, Live Oak, as it keeps green and “live” throughout winter, when other oaks have lost their leaves and are dormant. Reaching up to 80 feet tall, with a canopy as wide as it is tall, the Live Oak provides great shade and can be used as a street tree. The Live Oak does well in Florida as it can adapt to a variety of surroundings and has superior wind resistance. The Live Oak pictured is located in Flagler Village.

 

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Archontophenix alexandrae | Alexandra Palm


Archontophenix alexandrae | Alexandra Palm

Native to the coastal rainforest of northeastern Australia, the palm can also be found in tropical regions around the world including South Florida. This slender, fast growing palm increases 1-3 feet per year and averages 40 feet at full growth. The Alexandra Palm likes more water than most palms and can grow in full sun or in shade. It blooms white flower clusters on the lower branches which then produce red fruit.

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Tabebuia chrysantha | Yellow Tabebuia


Tabebuia chrysantha | Yellow Tabebuia

Have you noticed this yellow flowering tree around Fort Lauderdale? It’s the Tabebuia Chrysantha – Also known as Yellow Tabebuia or Golden Triumph Tree and is a pretty indicator that Spring is around the corner.

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Bauhinia blakeana | Hong Kong Orchid Tree


Bauhinia blakeana | Hong Kong Orchid Tree

Native to China, the medium-sized shade tree produces stunning, orchid-like flowers. The fragrant flower’s nectar attracts bees and hummingbirds and blooms from November through March. The tree’s bloom is the floral emblem of Hong Kong and the heart-shaped leaves are deemed a symbol of wisdom.

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Brugmansia suaveolens | Angel’s Trumpet


Brugmansia suaveolens | Angel’s Trumpet

Brugmansia suaveolens, Angel’s Trumpet is a small, ornamental tree native to South America. The striking long flowers emit a strong fragrance in the evenings to attract pollinating moths. The lifespan of the blooms are short but the Angel’s Trumpet can bloom year round.

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Guaiacum officinale | Lignum-vitae


Guaiacum officinale | Lignum-vitae

Guaiacum officinale, Lignum-vitae, Latin for “wood of life” was used in commercial ship building for centuries for its wood’s strength and thickness. The dense canopy is rich in dark green foliage and blooms small blue flowers during the springtime. The Lignum-vitae is the national tree of the Bahamas and the Jamaican national flower.

 

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Corypha umbraculifera | Talipot Palm


Corypha umbraculifera | Talipot Palm

This towering giant is the Corypha umbraculifera (Talipot Palm), a fan palm and one of the largest palms in the world. The palm averages 80 FT at full growth and will flower once which signals the end of its lifetime. This Talipot Palm is located along the Riverwalk.

 

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Hibiscus rosa-sinensis | Tropical Hibiscus Double Fuschia Pink ‘Pride of Hankins’

While there are several hundred varieties of the Hibiscus, The Pride of Hankins is a very old hybrid. The small, showy tree grows fast and keeps slender with ruffly double-layered flowers shining a bright fuchsia.

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Copernicia macroglossa | Cuban Petticoat Palm

Native to Cuba, the Cuban Petticoat Palm is found in subtropical and tropical spaces, and grows best with full sunlight. The palm receives its name from the older leaves that dry and form the unique covering around the trunk. The “petticoat” makes a home for small animals and insects. This Cuban Petticoat Palm is located along the riverwalk by the historic New River Inn.

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Madagascar Palm | Pachypodium lamerei


Madagascar Palm | Pachypodium lamerei

Pachypodium lamerei is a stem succulent that loves warm climate, full sun and is salt-tolerant which is why it is doing well along the Riverwalk.

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Bicentennial Liberty Oak Tree

In 1976, in commemoration of the United States’ 200th anniversary, the Bicentennial Oak Tree was relocated to this Riverwalk site. This tree is representative of the Liberty Trees found in many Colonial cities prior to the Revolution. The most well known of these trees was in Boston under whose branches the Sons of Liberty and other Patriots gathered in planning our independence from Great Britain. In honor of the victims and heroes of the Sept. 11, 2001, attack on America, the City of Fort Lauderdale and the Downtown Development Authority have rededicated and added the name Liberty to this tree.

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bulnesia arborea | Bulnesia or Vera Wood tree


Bulnesia arbora | Vera Wood Tree

This low growing tree is a Bulnesia arborea, a tropical tree native to Venezuela and Colombia. The 5 petal, deep yellow flowers bloom during the summer months. The tree was Introduced from Venezuela to South Florida by Dr. David Fairchild.

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Ceiba pentandra | Kapok


Ceiba pentandra | Kapok

Native to the tropical rainforests, the Ceiba pentandra, Kapok tree can reach heights of 150 feet. When the Kapok tree is young, the trunk produces pointy spines about an inch long to protect the tree from animals. The spines gradually wear off when the Kapok hits a stable, mature height. The bark has been used as a medicinal component and considered sacred in ancient civilizations.

 

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Coccoloba uvifera | Sea Grape

Coccoloba uvifera, Sea Grape is native to beaches throughout the tropical America and the Caribbean. When planted in coastal dunes, it can be used as a windbreak to help prevent erosion. This flowering tree is also tolerant to urban conditions and used in Florida landscapes. In late summer it produces grape-like clusters that can be made into jellies, wine and food for wildlife.

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Caryota gigas | Fishtail Palm


Caryota gigas | Fishtail Palm

The huge, lacy canopy of the Fishtail Palm spreads 20 feet or more and resembles a fish tail. The lifespan of the palm is relatively short (approximately 35 years) and will flower once at the end of its lifespan. The palm does best outside in full sun but can be indoors at the beginning of its growth.

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Ficus sur | Broom cluster fig


Ficus sur | Broom cluster fig

Ficus sur, Broom cluster fig – Native to South Africa, the massive Broom Cluster Fig can be found along wide-open riverbanks in warm climates. Natives claim the Ficus sur to have magical and antimicrobial properties and the bark, fruit, and leaves has been used in traditional medicine. The fruit attracts birds and bats and is edible when it changes from green to pink.

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Bursera simaruba | Gumbo Limbo


Bursar simaruba | Gumbo Limbo

The Gumbo Limbo is a very fast growing, medium sized tree hitting heights of 20-50 feet. The specimen tree thrives on little to no care and is considered one of the most wind-tolerant trees, making it sought-after for Florida gardens. The reddish bark peels away in thin flakes to reveal a smooth gray underbark. The Gumbo Limbo is jokingly nicknamed the Tourist Tree because of the bark’s resemblance to a sunburnt tourist.

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Phoenix sylvestris | Sylvester Date Palm Tree


Phoenix sylvestris | Sylvester Date Palm Tree

One of the more popular palms, the Sylvester Date Palm tree is favored because of its low maintenance and interesting diamond pattern trunk created by the leaf scars. In India, the sap is tapped to make Palm Jaggery, an unrefined sugar. Jaggery is known to have various medicinal properties and other health benefits.

Cordia sebestena | Geiger Tree


Cordia sebestena | Geiger Tree

The tree was named by John Audubon after a visit to study and sketch the birds of Key West where he noticed its beauty in John Geiger’s front yard. The showy, low-maintence tree blooms orange flowers throughout the year and is highly attractive to hummingbirds. The Geiger tree was introduced from Cuba.

 

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Acoelorrhaphe wrightii, Paurotis Palm


Acoelorrhaphe wrightii, Paurotis Palm

The Paurotis Palm is a clustering, fan-leaved palm native to southern Florida. The palm is also referred to as the Everglades Palm for its tolerance to standing water. Due to its natural dense foliage, it can make a great option for screening and flowers in the springtime.

 

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Rhizophora mangle | red mangrove


Rhizophora mangle | red mangrove

Red mangroves thrive in brackish water and swampy marshes and are important plant in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas coastal ecosystems. The aerial prop roots help build up new land along the shore and become a safe haven for animals.

 

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Ficus lyrata | Fiddle-leaf Fig


Ficus lyrata | Fiddle-leaf Fig

The fiddle-leaf fig is a species of fig tree, native to Western Africa. It receives its name from the shape of the broad leaves, resembling a fiddle. When young, the fiddle-leaf is a wildly popular house plant.

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Caesalpinia granadilla | Bridalveil Tree

Named after the delicate lace-like canopy, the Bridalveil is originally native to Venezuela and Northern South America. The multi-trunk tree’s bark exfoliates to show patches of muted colors. During the summer you’ll find small yellow blooms decorating the top of the tree.

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Ravenala madagascariensis | Travelers Palm

Not actually a palm, the large, banana-like fronds spread wide like a fan and collect rainwater in the sheaths of the stems. While not recommended, it is said that travelers would seek out this tree for emergency water, hence the name. At full growth, the Travelers Palm hits heights of 50 feet with a width of 20 feet.

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Ilex cassine | Dahoon Holly


Ilex cassine | Dahoon Holly

Found naturally in swamps and wet locations, the Dahoon Holly grows in boggy areas and sandy soils. Possessing male and female flowers on separate plants, a male and female Dahoon Hollies must be planted together for the bright red berries to fruit.

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Cyrtostachys renda | Lipstick Palm


Cyrtostachys renda | Lipstick Palm

Commonly known as a Red Sealing Wax palm and Lipstick palm, the names are derived from the red, vibrant crownshaft that sets this palm apart. Considered rare and exotic, the palm has an extremely slow growth rate making its availability hard to find. You’ll find Cyrtostachys renda growing naturally in its native swamps of Thailand, Malaysia, Sumatra, and Borneo.

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Pleopeltis polypodioides | Resurrection Fern


 

Pleopeltis polypodioides | Resurrection Fern

While the average plant can only withstand losing 10% of its water content, the Resurrection Fern has the ability to lose 75% to as much as 97% of its water during drought. Even though the fern will turn grayish brown and look to not be alive, it will “come back to life” when exposed to water.

The epiphytic fern is commonly found on large trees such as Oaks and Cypresses and can also grow on rocks. The Resurrection Fern does not steal nutrients or water from its host tree.

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Mangifera indica – Mango

One of the largest fruit-trees in the world, the tropical tree flowers early spring and produces through early summer. The edible fruit is sweet but contains Urushiol – a naturally occurring chemical that can trigger an allergic reaction (also found in cashews and poison ivy). Mango trees do not tolerate freezing temperatures and make their home in warm tropical to subtropical climates.

www.cadence-living.com #TreesofFortLauderdale